Last edited by Tygolabar
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

7 edition of White House pets. found in the catalog.

White House pets.

by Margaret Truman

  • 278 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by D. McKay Co. in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Presidents -- United States -- Pets

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE176.1 .T8
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 174 p.
      Number of Pages174
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5620669M
      LC Control Number68029633
      OCLC/WorldCa70279


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White House pets by Margaret Truman Download PDF EPUB FB2

A dedicated animal lover and pet owner himself, President Abraham Lincoln let his sons Tad and Willie, keep all the pets they wanted. And, oh the pets they kept. According to various historians, at one time the Lincoln’s White House menagerie grew to include turkeys, horses, Author: Robert Longley.

Weird White House Pets Weird White House Pets Weird White House Pets. Informational (nonfiction), words, Level F (Grade 1), Lexile L. The residents of the White House include not only presidents and their families, but also their pets.

Students will learn that the White House has been home to not only dogs and cats, but farm animals. Colorfully illustrated board book by Howard M. Kurtz. Over the past years, our U.S. presidents and their families have welcomed many different pets into the White House.

Ponies and puppies and cats and mice and a raccoon—and even an alligator—have spent time in this historic home. In this book, you’ll see some of those White House pets with the names of the presidents who welcomed. How are dogs, alligators, sheep, cats, and a host of other animals similar. They’ve all been residents of the president’s house as presidential pets.

Comical illustrations combine with the often laugh out loud funny tales of pets in the White House. Pets at the White House: 50 Years of Presidents and Their Pets, Jennifer B.

Pickens’ glossy mixture of stories and snapshots of White House pets, is the perfect coffee-table book to show that you’re a dedicated scholar with a soft-cuddly side. Over the years the White House has been home to a unique assortment of pets.

The list of Presidential pets is endless and the stories about them and their owners are bizarre, hilarious, touching, and filled with incidents that point out many a First Family soft spot, peculiarity and, in. Pets at the White House is a decent book for Kindergarten and first grade students.

I would use this book during a read aloud as an introduction of nonfiction text features. The book itself is pretty boring, but that is what I get for judging a book by its cover/5.

Weird White House Pets Weird White House Pets Weird White House Pets. Informational (nonfiction), words, Level F (Grade 1) The residents of the White House include not only presidents and their families, but also their pets.

Students will learn that the White House has been home to not only dogs and cats, but farm animals, woodland. After much deliberation about a new White House dog, in Aprilthe White House announced the selection of Bo, a male Portuguese water dog given to the Obamas by Senator and Mrs.

Ted Kennedy. Bo’s presence in the White House sparked nationwide interest in the breed and adoration of Bo as he became a member of the Obama family. The residents of the White House include not only presidents and their families, but also their pets.

Students will learn that the White House has been home to not only dogs and cats, but farm animals, woodland creatures, and even an alligator.

Favorite Presidential Pets. Abraham Lincoln (16th President, ) and his family took care of many animals, including a pig, a rabbit, ponies, cats, and dogs.

The president’s sons Tad and Willie especially loved their goats Nanny and Nanko. The boys would tie carts or kitchen chairs to the goats and race them around the White House, sometimes interrupting formal receptions. Over the years, the White House has been home to a unique assortment of pets.

As a guest of John Quincy Adams, General Lafayette kept a live alligator in the East Room. Calvin Coolidge's Enoch, a huge white goose, gift from actress Marie Dressler, was said to be worth $,/5(6).

About the Book. Pets at the White House provides a spectacular view into one of the most historic homes in the world and all of its four-legged, beaked, and pawed inhabitants—from ponies, puppies, and cats to parakeets, sheep, and even an alligator.

Pets at the White House, the second book from White House social expert Jennifer Pickens, is a spectacular view into one of the most historic homes in the world and all of its four-legged, beaked, and pawed inhabitants.

Read more». White House pets come in every size, shape, and species. With comical anecdotes and hilarious illustrations, this is a side-splitting look at American history shown through the most child-appealing White House residents. Activities. Learn more about the wackiest pets.

Pets at the White House: In "Pets at the White House", Jennifer Boswell Pickens offers a delightful series of anecdotes and photographs of our nation’s First Pets, creating an endearing volume that will appeal to animal lovers and presidential theorists alike. Although 5/5.

Pickens has created a delightful book. Its photos, many taken by White House staff photographers, are wonderful, and the accompanying text, although brief, is revelatory and entertaining. Pets at the White House is sure to be enjoyed by America’s millions of pet lovers and appreciate by those who follow the lives of nation’s First Families.

Get this from a library. Wackiest White House pets. [Kathryn Gibbs Davis; David Johnson] -- Describes the various kinds of pets, including grizzly bears and alligators, kept at the White House by various presidents from George Washington to George W.

Bush. Spot, a Springer spaniel, born in the White House in to George H. Bush's Millie (died Feb. 21, ); Barney, a Scottish terrier; India (“Willie”) the cat. The Bushes' orange-striped polydactyl cat Ernie was judged too wild for White House life and now lives with a family in California.

A History of Presidential Pets. first as the "author" of a children's book, Millie's Book: Initially, the Reagan White House was a dogless one, but that didn't last long. Anita McBride, Laura Bush's chief of staff in the White House, consulted on the book and said, "The pets really were a big part of helping to tell the story of life in the White House." "Pets at the White House” features more than photographs and interviews from former residents of Pennsylvania Ave., including Betty Ford, Barbara.

The coffee-table book devotes a chapter to each administration's pets from Kennedy to Obama. And an introduction gives an overview of the animals that were part of first families prior to Dad could take or leave pets,"" announces Miss Margaret, rather a pet herself on Pennsylvania Avenue in the Forties.

But President Truman seems to have been one of the few afaunal lairds of the White House. In this anecdotal splatter of pet tales, Miss Truman flips back and forth amongst White House apocrypha to unearth—in a regrettably prim recounting&#;pet miscellany from Washington.